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Next Club Outing

Holiday Party

Bruce and Pat Krevey will be hosting the Dive Club party on Sunday Afternoon Dec 15th 2pm at their home in Oakland.

Pot luck with the club providing a ham

 

In Other Ocean News:

Question: Is it legal to pick seaweed along the Mendocino coast? (Raymond L.)

Answer: Yes. Generally, up to 10 pounds wet weight per day may be harvested per person (with no more than 10 pounds in possession at any time). Exceptions include the followingprohibited species: sea palm, eel grass and surf grass. However, there are marine protected areas (MPAs) where the take of all living marine resources are prohibited (Point Cabrillo State Marine Reserve, Ten Mile State Marine Reserve, etc.), so be sure you are not in a restricted area before harvesting seaweed. For information about MPAs, please visit

www.dfg.ca.gov/marine/mpa

 

Question: Is it legal to pick seaweed along the Mendocino coast? (Raymond L.)

Answer: Yes. Generally, up to 10 pounds wet weight per day may be harvested per person (with no more than 10 pounds in possession at any time). Exceptions include the following prohibited species: sea palm, eel grass and surf grass. However, there are marine protected areas (MPAs) where the take of all living marine resources are prohibited (Point Cabrillo State Marine Reserve, Ten Mile State Marine Reserve, etc.), so be sure you are not in a restricted area before harvesting seaweed. For information about MPAs, please visit

www.dfg.ca.gov/marine/mpa.

 

CDFW Officers Snag Diver off Catalina Island

California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) officers cited a 46-year-old Ventura County man for using rubbing alcohol to force fish out of rocks and capturing them to sell. The diver was cited for two Fish and Game Code violations: use of a chemical while collecting marine aquaria and unlawful take of marine aquaria at Catalina Island, which is prohibited by law.

On the afternoon of Nov. 13, officers from the patrol boat Thresher observed a large recreational sailboat with commercial fishing license numbers painted on the stern anchored in Emerald Bay on the northeast coast of Catalina Island. Officers boarded the boat and found a man sport fishing. The angler told the officers that his partner was scuba diving.

 

Officers entered the 62-degree water and observed a diver squirting a liquid (later determined to be rubbing alcohol) from a bottle into cracks of rocks.

The liquid was forcing small fish, Blue Banded Goby (Lythrypnus dalli), into the open water where the man then caught them with a small aquarium fish net and immediately put them in a small plastic receptacle attached to his scuba gear. The warden used a mask and snorkel from just below the water’s surface to watch the diver squirt the bottle twice. The warden then dove down, showed the diver his warden identification, and directed the diver to come to the surface. Before ascending, the diver left one of his squirt bottles on the rocks and attempted to drop a small, mesh bag containing another squirt bottle. A warden retrieved both squirt bottles and the mesh bag.

Once on the sailboat, the suspect told the officers he was a licensed marine aquaria collector and his buyers were paying him $10 per fish.  He stated that he did not know it is illegal to use rubbing alcohol to catch the small fish, or that it is illegal to partake in marine aquaria collection operations off Santa Catalina Island.

The diver had 63 goby fish in the plastic receptacle attached to his gear. During the interview, officers saw another plastic sealed container underneath the boat. The second container was holding an additional 109 goby fish.  The fish were counted, photographed and returned to the sea.

The man’s dive gear was seized and charges will be filed with the Los Angeles County District Attorney.

The marine aquaria laws that protect Catalina Island prevent collectors from depleting local species around the island. Collecting marine aquaria from the ocean is legal with the proper permits.

 

Olympic flame carried underwater in world’s deepest lake

The Olympic flame has been carried underwater in Lake Baikal – the world’s deepest lake – as part of the Sochi 2014 Olympic Torch Relay.

 


The special event – which follows the Olympic torch’s expeditions to the North Pole and outer space – saw three Torchbearers in full diving gear pass the flame to each other at a depth of 13 metre

The Olympic flame was able to stay lit during the dive thanks to a special burner, which was designed and developed in a similar way to flares used for warning signals at sea.


As the last underwater torchbearer, Vronsky brought the flame to the surface of the lake and passed it to Mikhail Chuev, who spectacularly rocketed over the lake at a height of 10-metres using a special jetpack, which allowed him to bring the lit Torch directly to the shore.

 

Diving into Hearst Castle's Neptune Pool



Four divers slid below the 58-degree water in Hearst Castle’s iconic outdoor Neptune Pool this week, looking for cracked tiles and other reasons why the pool is losing between 3,000 and 5,000 gallons of water a day.



The task list for the State Parks dive team members from Orange County and Santa Cruz included:


• Locate by sight and touch any crack or problem in the Vermont marble tile, grout lines, ladders, grates, drains, pipes and other features. They ran their hands along every single tile, according to diver Ken Kramer.
• Verify each leak by injecting harmless dye into the crack or flaw. An active leak would suck the dye down into the tile, Kramer said.
• Document what they found with markings, notes, precise measurements, photos and underwater video.
• Relay every find in real time to onsite members of a management team that’s preparing an official report on the problem.


That summary of damages, repair options and the estimated cost of each option is due by March, Franco said. State officials then will review the summary and recommend which fixes to fund.


An early estimate this year put repair costs at $10 million in voter-approved state bond funds for two major deferred-maintenance projects at the Castle: fixing the pool and replacing/repairing the red Spanish tile on the 60,645-square-foot La Casa Grande main house. By Tuesday morning, divers had already located some major leaks, including a 1⁄8-inch crack near the pool’s southeast corner, below the Cassou swan statue, Museum Director Hoyt Fields said, plus a “huge crack on the wall by one of the marble ladders.”


The divers also found about $1 in coins in the upper reflecting pond, perhaps tossed there by wish-making visitors.

Watch divers on Youtube: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OFoczB7ZEdg#t=13

 

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