Barbary Coast Dive Club Newsletter

News and Events

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Kayaking Drake's Estuary, Point Reyes Sunday February 27th

Here's a mini synopsis. High tide is 1:20 pm. So we thought we'd put out at noon, hit the beach, have a picnic, then paddle back, be back on shore at 6 (it gets dark later then). We'll be fighting current somewhat. but not horrendously, which is why we're not putting out earlier. More details to come. It's free, although Jonathan, my housemate and our guide, says he enjoys Fort Bragg's Lost Coast Brewery No. 88 Stout. So bring some, I'll ... er ... I mean he will appreciate it. I'm sure of it. Yes bring lots. For him I mean. (just kidding he doesn't imbibe).

By the way dues are due for BCD. Send your hard earned cash to Carol.

Invitation to Join the MLPA Initiative List Server

Dear Friend of the Ocean,

Your name and e-mail address have been provided by the Department of Fish and Game (DFG) as having an interest in the Marine Region's activities related to abalone, nearshore fish stocks, management plans, or the Marine Life Protection Act (MLPA) process.

I would like to invite you to join a list server specific to the MLPA Initiative, launched late last year by Secretary for Resources Mike Chrisman and DFG Director Ryan Broddrick, with the assistance of private funding partners. Information about the initiative can be found at www.dfg.ca.gov/mrd/mlpa.

If you would like to join the list, you may do so automatically by sending a message to Majordomo@resources.ca.gov with the following plain text (no html or rich text) in the body of your e-mail message: subscribe MLPAInitiative. You must send your message from the e-mail account you want subscribed to the list.

If you have any questions or difficulty subscribing yourself, please contact me. Our apologies in advance if you have already been invited to join this list or are currently a member. Thanks in advance for understanding.

Melissa Miller-Henson

Operations & Communications Manager
Marine Life Protection Act Initiative
c/o California Resources Agency
1416 Ninth Street, Suite 1311
Sacramento, CA 95814
916.654.2506 Phone
916.653.8102 Fax
Melissa@resources.ca.gov

Some NOAA websites

NOAA: http://www.noaa.gov

NOAA’s National Ocean Service: http://www.oceanservice.noaa.gov

NOAA’s Satellite and information Services: http://www.nesdis.noaa.gov

nowCOAST: http://nowcoast.noaa.gov/

 

Elephanat Seal Walk, Ana Nuevo. Still may be spot or two open. Cost is $5 per person plus a &6 vehicle fee. You can get more info at the web site of http://www.anonuevo.org

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Florida Divers Become Tail Hookers
Divers in Pensacola, Florida are going to be in for a real treat. The Navy recently announced plans to sink the retired aircraft carrier USS Oriskany in the waters near Pensacola as an artificial reef this summer.

The sinking will make the retired Oriskany the largest vessel in the United States deliberately sunk to create an artificial reef. However, is unlikely to hold that distinction for long. The military has announced that it will soon begin reviewing places to sink 24 other ships, including three aircraft carriers said Navy spokeswoman Patricia Dolan.

The 888-foot Oriskany is the first vessel in a new program designed to dispose of obsolete warships by sinking them as a cheaper alternative to the scrap yard. The ship also will serve as an underwater military memorial.

Sinking the Oriskany will make many Navy veterans happy. "It’s going to make a lot of people happy. There is a lot of emotion associated with this ship," said Lee Puglia of the Oriskany Reunion Association, which campaigned hard for the site near Pensacola because of the ship’s role as a pilot-training base.

No date has been set for the sinking in 212 feet of water 22 miles southeast of Pensacola.

Orca Whales Now Listed As Endangered


In March, the Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) listed Puget Sound’s southern resident orca whales as endangered under the state Endangered Species Act (ESA).

"This is an important step in protecting our resident Orcas," said Kathy Fletcher, executive director of People For Puget Sound. We will be looking to federal agencies to follow the state’s leadership," she added.

WDFW found the southern resident Orcas should be listed as endangered as their population has dropped dramatically, by 18%, since 1995. Without aggressive recovery efforts, the declines are likely to continue due to pollution and habitat destruction, leaving the Orcas full of toxins, and lacking their primary food source, salmon.

The state listing will entail the development of a recovery plan for the Orcas, which will be developed with the Canadian government, which has already listed the whales as endangered under the Canadian version of the ESA.

Puget Sound southern resident Orcas are identified in three groups, the J, K and L- pods. They feed primarily on salmon, and all can be seen in Puget Sound from late spring to autumn. While K and L-pods spend some of the winter months out in the ocean, J-pod stays in the Sound and Straits year-round.

Plans Announced for Reunited Luna with L-Pod


One L-pod resident, Luna, is currently separated from his pod, and has been living alone in Canada’s Nootka Sound for nearly three years. Canadian officials have announced a joint U.S./Canadian plan to reunite Luna with his pod in the coming weeks. Currently L-pod has only one breeding male, rendering Luna’s return critical to the resident population.

The agencies will initially try to lead Luna to his pod if they swim close to Nootka Sound this spring. If this plan fails, the agencies will consider capturing and moving Luna to the San Juan Islands this summer or fall, to reunite with his pod in Washington waters.

"We are pleased both Canadian and U.S. agencies are recognizing the importance of our orca whales, both Luna and the entire resident population," said Fletcher. "We look forward to working with these agencies to continue to clean up and restore the waters of Puget Sound and the Northwest Straits for the whales, and all marine wildlife that call this amazing resource home."

People For Puget Sound is a non-profit citizens’ group working to protect and restore the health of Puget Sound and the Northwest Straits through education and action. Our vision is a clean and healthy Sound, teeming with fish and wildlife, cared for by people who live here. For more information visit: www.pugetsound.org.


 

 

 

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updated 1/15/05